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Maiden Post

Hello everyone,   this is my maiden post for this new blog.  What's it supposed to be or do?   I hope that we engage on some of the applied lessons of t'ai chi -- find examples and stories from our daily lives where t'ai chi can come in handy.  I will try to catch them in my web-mind to save for posting, or keep my ears peeled for others' stories and welcome you to do the same.

I'll also post my weekly class schedule, for students of mine, in and around Brooklyn.

Winter classes this month

 Thursday,  December 28   - cancelled for the holiday week


Next class, January 4 at spoke the Hub  Come at 11 for some hot, perfectly brewed tea, courtesy of Ting



 



  




Please note...Friday classes will be cancelled for the foreseeable future 

where:  spoke the Hub, 748 Union Street
              By train, the R to Union or the 2,3 to Grand Army Plaza

Hope to see you soon!  



Just posted a new entry on this blog,  "Ruminations on Posture"  Check it out!




Check out this addition  (a link to an article put out by the Harvard Gazette)  A memorable quote in this piece by a student of t'ai chi -- 

"in class, we move hands like clouds and when we leave class, we walk on clouds" 

In a nutshell, the piece summarizes a recent study reported on this past April, about the benefits of t'ai chi in improving balance and alleviating arthritic pain.  This is a finding that has been reported on repeatedly, but it never hurts to remind ourselves.  I believe that balance is perhaps the most striking and confirmable benefits of regular t'ai chi practice.  

Re back pain:  
A report that came out earlier in the year --  The scientific community seldom recognizes t'ai chi among the mindfulness techniques.

Anyway,  there was an exception recently.   The American College of Physicians published last spring a new study re back pain.   Basically, it states  that someone suffering pain should not "medicalize" the problem -- in other words, don't go the route of X-rays, MRIs and def not opioids.  But DO go the non-medical route.

to quote:  For patients with chronic low back pain,  the American College of Physicians recommends that physicians and patients initially select non-drug therapy with exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based stress reduction, tai chi...

It was so nice for we t'ai chi students and teachers to have this amazing and effective movement- art recognized.

Jing (tranquility),

Susan






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ruminations on posture

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it’s quite an image,  though,  your crown attached umbilically to the heavens,  and we may struggle a bit trying to visualize it, let alone to enact, and then to stay like this throughout the one hour class!   Don’t feel discouraged.  Almost no-one can manage it.  I tell my class that it’s probably the hardest part of the pose and the form — keeping your eyes focused ahead, your head relaxed on the stem of your neck.   
does anyone really do it?


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